We're two cousins trying to raise awareness for Lyme Disease in the hopes that it will be prevented, more efficiently diagnosed, and treated. One of us has Lyme Disease (B) and the other does not but is determined to get the word out (C). Help us spread the word about Lyme Disease.

8th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Communicating Chronic Pain with 176 notes

Source: sudipdasin

7th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Diaries of a Buggy Girl with 43,892 notes

Doctor: You’ll get over her, Isaac. Just takes a little bit of time. You’ll see.
Isaac: Did he seriously just say you’ll see?

Source: geekmia

6th October 2014

Photo reblogged from An inner view of Adult Onset Stills Disease with 8 notes

mamas-still-doing-it-all:

A reminder for all of us waiting for a cure.

mamas-still-doing-it-all:

A reminder for all of us waiting for a cure.

5th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Communicating Chronic Pain with 88,302 notes

recoveringfromcfs:

stanley-tsaii:

Just a set of quick photos I did for class.

Chronic illness 101.

Source: spoopy-stanley

4th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Diaries of a Buggy Girl with 582 notes

chronicallypainful:

So, I was wanting validation and expression and I took nontoxic washable markers and tried to draw my pain onto my body. Very literally making my invisible pain visible.

(Sorry, don’t have spoons for image descriptions right now. Will write later.)

Source: chronicallypainful

3rd October 2014

Chat reblogged from Got Spoons? with 356 notes

  • Healthy person: How are you?
  • Me (internally): Well I'm flaring so badly I'm pretty sure this is what death feels like. My joints keep dislocating, I want to sleep 14 hours a day from exhaustion, and can't keep any food down. Not to mention the fainting.
  • Me (to them): I'm good! How are you?
  • Them: Urgh, I feel so awful. I have a cold! It is so hard function while being sick!

Source: heyatleastitsnotcancer

2nd October 2014

Photo reblogged from Got Spoons? with 839,958 notes

artbymoga:

stylefordays:

tyleroakley:

9 words to make you really think.

This. Is. Profound.

This is something everyone should see

artbymoga:

stylefordays:

tyleroakley:

9 words to make you really think.

This. Is. Profound.

This is something everyone should see

Source: flinch-nerds

1st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 1,130 notes

Brian Regan’s Emergency Room Adventures

Source: blangyouredead

30th September 2014

Post reblogged from Got Spoons? with 252 notes

After a particularly disappointing doctor appointment…

whatshouldwecallchronicillness:

image

Source: whatshouldwecallchronicillness

29th September 2014

Post reblogged from The Lyme Diary with 15 notes

Study: 9 in 10 ALS patients infected with Lyme bacteria

thelymediary:

There have been several studies that found a strong link between Lyme disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. The Halperin paper is one. The Halperin paper found Lyme infection in nearly all ALS patients in their study group, but Halperin, a long-time “debunker” of chronic Lyme disease dismissed this as a “coincidence” and the paper’s authors even fudged the numbers in their summary to make the Lyme infection rate seem “only” 47%.

Not too long ago, scientific research papers were freely available online but nowadays, most are zealously guarded by a few publishing conglomerates that charge about the same for an article as you would expect to pay for the latest music DVD of a superstar. When you purchase, you give them your name, address, email address and IP address and have to agree not to reproduce the article. The whole system is designed to keep medical breakthroughs secret to the public in general and journalists in particular, and to intimidate and prosecute those who seek to uncover such secret knowledge. Aaron Swartz sacrificed his life trying to change this situation.

No wonder that the average person with ALS has no inkling of the fact that there is solid research, showing that ALS is strongly associated with Lyme disease.

The Halperin paper mentions in its first paragraph (green box below) that nine out of nineteen ALS patients tested positive for Lyme. The notoriously unreliable ELISA test was used, a test with an unacceptably high proportion of false negatives. So that would be 47% of ALS patients testing positive for Lyme.

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